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Regimen Taxonomy in the CCO Drug Formulary
 

Objectives

  • To establish standard rules in nomenclature for chemotherapy regimens to improve consistency, patient safety, data quality and standardization of practice
  • To support evolving clinical practice

Method

An algorithm to aid decision making was developed based on an environmental scan of regimen taxonomy from other cancer institutions, and from inconsistencies in the previous CCO regimen nomenclature. A working group methodically progressed through the decision points and made recommendations for a standardized approach to regimen naming, accommodating historical preferences and data reporting requirements.

The Regimen Taxonomy will be applied to regimens in the Standard, Local and Emergent categories only.

A.  Regimen Taxonomy
B.  Method for Truncating Drug Names
C.  List of Abbreviated Drug Names
D.  Regimen Suffixes
E.  Commonly Used Regimen Acronyms

A. Regimen Taxonomy

i.
Use generic names. 
(e.g., doxorubicin) 
ii.
Standard rules are used to truncate drug names.
(e.g., DOXO; see section B .)
iii.
For drugs with multiple common names, use the name as it appears on the product packaging. 
(e.g., LCVR for leucovorin) 
iv. Maximum of 16 characters in regimen name. 
(e.g., CISPDOXOETOPMTTN; for Cisplatin-Doxorubicin-Etoposide-Mitotane)
v.
Regimen name does not include disease site and treatment intent. 
(e.g., CISP)
vi.
Keep commonly used regimen acronyms (defined by the working group – see section D). 
(e.g., FOLFIRI for Leucovorin-Fluorouracil-Irinotecan)
vii.
For other regimens, use truncated drug names.

viii.
Within a regimen name, the drugs are arranged in alphabetical order. 
(e.g., CISPGEMC for Cisplatin-Gemcitabine)
ix.
Monoclonal antibody treatment options appear after the chemotherapy component. 
(e.g., FOLFIRI+BEVA for FOLFIRI with Bevacizumab)
x.
Use “+” to indicate a concurrently given regimen.
(e.g., CHOP+R for CHOP with Rituximab)
xi.
Use a dash ( - ) to indicate a sequentially given regimen. (e.g., AC-PACL for AC followed by Paclitaxel)
xii.
Use suffix(es) in brackets to indicate supplementary information.
(e.g., (PO); see section C .)
xiii.
Separate multiple suffixes with dashes ( - ). 
[e.g., FU(IV-CIV-RT-IV), for Fluorouracil bolus, then continuous infusion with radiation treatment, followed by bolus]

B.  Method for Truncating Drug Names

  • Keep names to maximum of 4 characters if possible
  • Use the first 4 letters of drug name (i.e. DOXO)
  • Special formulations:  
  • Pegylated = PG
  • Liposomal = L
  • Nanoparticle albumin bound = N
  • Erwinia = ER
  • The following abbreviations contain fewer than 4 characters and will be used since these are very common: FU (fluorouracil), BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guerin)  

Issue

Action

The first 3 letters of 2 or more full drug names are the same (i.e., vincristine, vinorelbine, vinblastine)

OR

If 3 letters are in the same positions for 2 or more truncated drug names

OR

The truncated name appears similar to a commonly used abbreviation [i.e., fulvestrant (FULV) versus fluorouracil-leucovorin; methotrexate versus mitoxantrone (MTXN)]

OR

If 2 or more truncated drug names are made of the same 4 consonants, and the first 2 letters are identical and in the same positions (i.e., MTTN and MTNT for mitotane, mitoxantrone)

Use the first 4 consonants for each of these similar drug names

If any issues occur, use the next consonant available in its full name to make the truncated version unique.

If any issues persist, keep the first 4 letters for one of the names, and then use the first 4 consonants for the other similar names. Try to use the next consonant in the sequence until a unique truncated name is formed.

C.  List of abbreviated drug names

Drug Name

Truncated Name

Abiraterone
ABIR

Aldesleukin

ALDE

Alemtuzumab

ALEM

Altretamine

ALTR

Amsacrine

AMSA

Anagrelide

ANGR

Anastrozole

ANAS

Asparaginase

ASPA

Axitinib
AXIT

Azacitidine

AZCT

BCG

BCG

Bevacizumab

BEVA

Bicalutamide

BICA

Bleomycin

BLEO

Bortezomib

BORT

Buserelin

BSRL

Busulfan

BSLF

Cabazitaxel
CABA

Capecitabine

CAPE

Carboplatin

CRBP

Carmustine

CRMS

Cetuximab

CETU

Chlorambucil

CHLO

Cisplatin

CISP

Cladribine

CLAD

Clodronate

CLDN

Clofarabine

CLFR

Crizotinib
CRIZ

Cyclophosphamide

CYCL

Cyproterone

CYPR

Cytarabine

CYTA

Dacarbazine

DCRB

Dactinomycin

DCTN

Danazol

DNZL

Darbepoetin

DARB

Dasatinib

DASA

Daunorubicin

DAUN

Degarelix

DGRL

Denosumab
DENO

Dexamethasone

DEXA

Dexrazoxane

DXRZ

Docetaxel

DOCE

Doxorubicin

DOXO

Epirubicin

EPIR

Eribulin
ERIB

Erlotinib

ERLO

Erwinia Asparaginase

ERASP

Erythropoetin

ERYT

Estramustine

ESTM

Etoposide

ETOP

Everolimus

EVER

Exemestane

EXEM

Filgrastrim

FILG

Fludarabine

FLUD

Fluorouracil

FU

Flutamide

FLUT

Fulvestrant

FLVS

Gefitinib

GEFI

Gemcitabine

GEMC

Goserelin

GOSE

Hydroxyurea

HYDR

Ibritumomab

IBRI

Idarubicin

IDAR

Ifosfamide

IFOS

Imatinib

IMAT

Interferon Alfa

IFNA

Ipilimumab
IPIL

Irinotecan

IRIN

Lapatinib

LAPA

Lenalidomide

LENA

Letrozole

LETR

Leucovorin

LCVR

Leuprolide

LPRL

Liposomal Doxorubicin

LDOX

Lomustine

LOMU

Mechlorethamine

MECH

Medroxyprogesterone

MEDR

Megestrol

MEGE

Melphalan

MELP

Mercaptopurine

MERC

Mesna

MESN

Methotrexate

MTRX

Methylprednisolone

MTPR

Mitomycin

MTMC

Mitotane

MTTN

Mitoxantrone

MXNT

Nab-paclitaxel

NPAC

Nilotinib

NILO

Nilutamide

NLTM

Octreotide

OCTR

Ofatumumab
OFAT

Oxaliplatin

OXAL

Paclitaxel

PACL

Pamidronate

PMDR

Panitumumab

PNTM

Peg-asparaginase

PGASP

Pegfilgrastim

PGFIL

Pegylated Liposomal-Doxorubicin

PGLDX

Pemetrexed

PEME

Porfimer

PORF

Prednisone

PRED

Procarbazine

PROC

Raltitrexed

RALT

Rituximab

RITU

Ruxolitinib
RUXO

Sorafenib

SORA

Streptozocin

STRE

Sunitinib

SUNI

Tamoxifen

TMXF

Temozolomide

TMZL

Temsirolimus

TEMS

Teniposide

TENI

Testosterone

TEST

Thalidomide

THAL

Thioguanine

THGN

Thiotepa

THTP

Topotecan

TOPO

Tositumomab

TOSI

Trastuzumab

TRAS

Tretinoin

TRET

Triptorelin

TRIP

Vandetanib
VAND
Vemurafenib
VEMU

Vinblastine

VNBL

Vincristine

VNCR

Vinorelbine

VINO

Vorinostat

VRNS

Zoledronic Acid

ZOLE

D. Regimen Suffixes

  • Represents other information related to the regimen
  • Other suffixes to be added when required

Regimen Detail

Suffix

Intensive

I

Dose Dense

DD

High dose

HD

Intermediate dose

ID

Low dose

LD

With radiotherapy

RT

Continuous infusion

CIV

Oral

PO

Intravenous

IV

Intra-arterial

IA

Intramuscular

IM

Intrathecal

IT

Subcutaneous

SC

Topical

TOP

Intraperitoneal

IP

Every “x” week cycle

QxW,

where x = a number

For a certain number of days

(e.g. 5d vs 3d)

xD,

where x = a number

Weekly

W

Daily

D

Alternative with

/

Induction

IND

Intensification

INT

Maintenance

MNT

Modified

MOD

Sequential add-on regimen/drug

“- “(dash, as in AC-PACL)

Concurrent add-on regimen/drug

“+” (as in FOLFIRI+BEVA)

E.  Commonly Used Regimen Acronyms

All drugs are referred to by their generic names. Trade names and manufacturers are noted where applicable. For ease of use and consistency, we have used some common acronyms for multi-drug regimens, even though an acronym may refer to the trade name of one or more drugs.

e.g., CAF: cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, fluorouracil

In these cases, we list the drug's generic name (instead of the trade name) next to the acronym.

e.g., CAF refers to Cyclophosphamide, ADRIAMYCIN® (Doxorubicin), Fluorouracil

Use of trade names does not constitute endorsement by the Formulary of any particular brand of drug in circumstance where multiple generic equivalents are available.

Last modified: Wed, Oct 24, 2012
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