printemailclick to share buttonfacebooktwitterlinkedin
Person-Centred Care Guideline
 

The Person-Centred Care (PCC) Program in collaboration with the Program in Evidence-Based Care (PEBC) has developed a Person-Centred Care Guideline to set the standard of care that people experiencing cancer (i.e., patients, family members, and carers) in Ontario should expect to receive. This guideline is a foundational step forward to advancing a person-centred approach to care delivery and to improving the patient experience across Ontario.

Test Your Knowledge of PCC

Screenshot of video

This PCC training video aims to support healthcare staff, including providers and administrators, in their efforts to integrate the recommendations of the PCC Guideline into their roles. This video focuses on defining some fundamental concepts of PCC, and how our health system is striving to achieve it. Click the link to watch the video and assess your knowledge of PCC.

Why a Person-Centred Care Guideline?

We have evolved from an approach in our healthcare system that is system- or provider-centred—in which medical needs take priority and patients have little input into the design and delivery of the services they receive—to an approach that is centred around the patient and improving their entire experience. Cancer Care Ontario identified the importance of engaging patients, their family members, and caregivers at the system level and at the level of care delivery.

Cancer Care Ontario recognizes that staff, clinicians, scientists and partners need guidance to understand what it means to work in true and meaningful partnership with our patients, family members, and caregivers.

The PCC Guideline consists of five key areas of Person-Centred Care:

Knowing the patient as an individual
Knowing the Patient as an Individual

Knowing the patient as an individual is the first of five sections of the PCC Guideline This section starts the guideline on a powerful premise: the importance of treating the person, and not just the disease. Patients value healthcare professionals acknowledging their individuality and the unique way in which they experience a condition.. Recognizing the holistic aspect to care is fundamental to person-centred care delivery.

Legislation

The section, Knowing the patient as an individual, and corresponding recommendations therein are written in alignment with:

Essential requirements of care
Essential requirements of care

Section two of the PCC guideline builds on the first section of the guideline, Knowing the patient as an individual, by ensuring consistent support for patient needs that fall beyond the treatment scope of their specific health condition(s). PCC requires that patients feel respected, that patient concerns are listened to and addressed, that various aspects of patient care (i.e., nutrition, pain) are appropriately managed, that patients are provided support to maintain independence, and that all of the above is done with patient consent.

  • Respect for the patient
  • Patient independence
  • Patient concerns
  • Consent and capacity
  • Nutrition, pain management, and personal needs

The section, Essential requirements of care, and corresponding recommendations therein are written in alignment with:

Tailoring healthcare services for each patient
Tailoring Healthcare Services for Each Patient

The third section of the PCC guideline complements the earlier sections with a focus on tailoring the healthcare system to meet the unique needs, preferences, and circumstances of the individual. Care should be as personalized and individualized as possible.

Legislation

The section, Tailoring healthcare services for each patient, and corresponding recommendations therein are written in alignment with:

Continuity of care and relationships
Continuity of care and relationships

Continuity and consistency of care, and establishing trusting, reliable relationships with healthcare professionals is key to a positive patient experience and to receiving effective care. This section understands that open and systematic sharing of information between professionals and across healthcare boundaries supports high-quality, person-centred care.

The section, Continuity of care and relationships, and corresponding recommendations therein are written in alignment with:

Enabling patients to actively participate in their care
Enabling patients to actively participate in their care

The last section of the PCC Guideline focuses on promoting a positive outcome of Person-Centred Care, to ensure patients are enabled to be active participants in their own healthcare, by involving them in creating and managing their health strategy and the use of services. The section identifies four key areas that encourage self-management and self-care: communication, information, shared decision making, and education programs.

Shared decision refers to the mutually beneficial partnership of patient with care providers to collectively make decisions. This is not a legal model, but rather a model to create an environment in which the patient is willing and able to share the responsibility of making decisions about their own treatment and care.

  • Communication
  • Information
  • Shared decision making
  • Education programs

The section, Enabling patients to actively participate in their care, and corresponding recommendations therein are written in alignment with the following Cancer Care Ontario guidelines:


Last modified: Mon, Jul 27, 2015
cancer care ontario | action cancer ontario   620 University Avenue Toronto Ontario, Canada M5G 2L7   Phone: 416.971.9800 Fax: 416.971.6888

Please help improve the quality of our website by answering 10 brief questions in our online survey. Would you like to participate?

YesNo